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 •  October 18

This past spring, David Mifflin looked at his credit report online and saw that something wasn't right. There were inquiries from Chase Bank about an application for a credit card that someone was trying to open in his name. Mifflin, who lives in San Antonio, Texas, says he called the bank and was told the identity thieves "had my Social Security...

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 •  October 6

Many payday lenders could go out of business if rules made final this week by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau go into effect. But the changes face stiff headwinds from Republicans in Congress. One new rule would require payday and auto title lenders to determine if a borrower can afford to repay in full within 30 days. That could thwart a...

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 •  October 4

Richard Smith, Equifax's former CEO who stepped down just last week, faced a roomful of angry senators and some tough questions at a hearing Wednesday. It was the second of three congressional hearings he is testifying in front of this week. Republicans and Democrats alike are upset about the massive hack of Social Security numbers and other...

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 •  September 21

The Equifax data breach exposed the personal information of an estimated 143 million Americans. It has led to a lawsuit against the company by the state of Massachusetts, an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission, and the promise of congressional hearings. The episode, though, has revealed that up until now, the big three credit reporting...

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 •  September 20

The letters "CFPB" may not be much more than alphabet soup to your average student loan borrower. They stand for Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a new-ish federal agency — created in 2011 — with a unique mission. This "soup" packs a powerful punch for student lenders and for-profit colleges accused of defrauding or otherwise mistreating...

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 •  September 14

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: To talk more about the Equifax breach, we're going to turn now to the federal government's chief consumer advocate. Richard Cordray runs the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. It was created during the Obama administration to address some of the problems that led to the financial collapse of 2008. He is the first person to...

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 •  September 8

Three executives of the credit-reporting agency Equifax sold nearly $2 million worth of company stock within days of a massive data breach potentially affecting 143 million Americans — one that wasn't publicly disclosed until more than a month later. In a statement, Equifax says the executives "had no knowledge that an intrusion had occurred at the...

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 •  September 8

DAVID GREENE, HOST: Equifax, the big credit reporting agency, reports that it was hacked in May. Whoever did the hacking seems to have gained access to Social Security numbers, home addresses, driver's licenses and a lot of other information for up to 143 million Americans. Craig Timberg covers technology for The Washington Post and joins us. Hey...

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 •  July 11

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: Some other news now. Federal regulators have announced a new rule that could clear the way for more class action lawsuits against banks and other financial firms. At issue are so-called arbitration clauses that companies use to block customers from joining class actions. NPR's Chris Arnold explains. CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE:...

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 •  July 10

A federal consumer watchdog agency has issued a new rule that will prevent credit card companies and banks from requiring customers to agree to settle disputes by arbitration rather than going to court. In a statement released Monday, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau explained: "Hundreds of millions of contracts for consumer financial...